Graphic Authority Timeless

While there are all sorts of places to get backgrounds, textures, overlays, ornaments, and other design elements, many of them for free, if you’re looking for collections with consistent design principles, you can’t go wrong by looking through the collections offered by Graphic Authority. One of my personal favorites is their Timeless collection. I’ve been using Timeless, well, for some time now. I thought that I might run through an example or two of its use and flexibility.

Let’s start with this image of Landry. [BTW, click on any thumbnail to see a larger version and to navigate among the images.]

Landry

Landry

This is pretty much out of the camera (D700) with just a bit of sharpening on her eyes. Now, I like to use Media Pro as a method of searching through available textures, backgrounds, and so on; so I’ve made a special catalog just for that purpose. In looking through my catalog with the Timeless collection, I first identified a background that I wanted to use for this image. You can see on the lower left of the screen shot that this particular background is part of the Vintage set within Timeless.

Select background

Select background

One of the great things about Media Pro, as you can see, is the ability to define any number of programs that can be used to open and edit images. In the present case, I’m taking this background into PS CS6 to work it into my composite result.

Next, I want an edge. This screen shot shows my selection from the folder in Vintage that contains the edges.

Pick an edge

Pick an edge

I bring this into PS as well, and then stack the edge over the background (after rotating them both by 90°).

Stacked layers

Stacked layers

Doesn’t look like much, so far, does it? Well, wait just a second. Now, I put Landry’s image over the edge layer and set it up as a clipping mask.

Before executing clipping mask

Before executing clipping mask

This shot was taken before executing the clipping mask command. After doing that, I can adjust the size and relationship between the edge and the image of Landry.

Aligning layers

Aligning layers

We could be done right now, but I want to add a couple of other elements to the design. First, from the Scribe collection of Timeless, I select a graphic element that shows a scale for an old map.

Map scale element

Map scale element

You’ll notice that this is a PNG file, and in Media Pro, transparency is shown as a yellow background to the element. So, this overlay will just show the scale in PS. Here it is, stacked over the image so far. By the way, “Echelle d’un mil” is French for “Scale of one mile”, for what it’s worth.

Overlay added to image

Overlay added to image

Of course, I don’t want this element so large, in its current location, or with this black color. I’ll scale it down, move it to the right side of the image, give it a color consistent with the image, and put some other blending options on it. After rescaling and moving the element, I go into the blending options and select a color for the element from Landry’s hair, as shown:

Select the color of her hair

Select the color of her hair

I could also have picked a color that was complementary to this using the Kuler system, but I like the look of this. Next, I’ll give this bevel, emboss, and drop shadow options to make it stand out a bit more.

Other blending options

Other blending options

Now, by going to the overall blending options, and selecting the lower left slider with the option key held down (alt on Windows), I can break that slider into two distinct components. By bringing the one over as shown, I can fade the design element into the background somewhat, giving it a more “organic” feel.

Fading the element in

Fading the element in

Now, I want to add in another text element from the Scribe collection. This screen shot shows more detail of this text element, being a description in French of certain troop movements.

Text element

Text element

The next screen shot shows this element brought into location and properly scaled.

Text element added

Text element added

Now, just by holding down the option button while selecting the blending option stack from the graphic element and dragging it all to this new text element, I can quickly copy the entire set over to the text element. With that done, I went back in and made the color overlay just slightly darker and faded the text in just a touch more, with this result.

Text element blended

Text element blended

Now, we’re almost done. I just want to adjust the color of the background a touch. By selecting the bottom, color layer for the background, and then picking a color from Landry’s eyes, I can get something that picks up that color and complements it nicely.

Pick the color of her eyes

Pick the color of her eyes

We’re done and this is the finished product, after brightening up her face with a curves layer.

Landry, complete

Landry, complete

Now, for something completely different, let’s try a different background:

A second background

A second background

By masking Landry’s image and blending onto this background and then adding the following graphic element on top, and then masking it out where it would otherwise be applied to her face, we can get a completely different result. BTW, masking was done with onOne’s Mask Pro.

Another design element

Another design element

This time, by softening the color and adding a glow, a more subtle effect can be achieved with the scroll work overlay.

Blended layer stack

Blended layer stack

Here is version 2, after some retouching of skin, face, and eyes using Anthropic’s Portrait Professional.

Landry_v2

Landry_v2

OK, I can’t help myself. Here’s just one more version, beginning with the same image of Landry. In this case, without all of the detail, I picked a background and edge from the Rustic collection within Timeless. I then used the edge as a clipping mask for Landry’s image. On top of this, I added an ornament overlay that was consistent with the scroll-work in the background and I scaled and sized this so it just fit over the edge that is clipping the image of Landry. I then selected a bright part of Landry’s skin for a color overlay in the blend mode for the ornament, and I turned on bevel and emboss. Then I masked the ornament overlay back away from Landry’s face. All of this work took about three minutes, really… Very easy.

Landry, version 3

Landry, version 3

I hope you’ve found these examples of some interest. They’re completely different approaches to the same image. You might note that each of these results were extremely easy to achieve in a very short time.

Have fun with these…

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